Our families progress! (Pictures)

Protector
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Re: Our families progress! (Pictures)

Post by Protector »

In fact anyone would like a family to come over and help them advance their homestead and exchange safe places to go if things stay as is or get bad please let me know. I'll make the first step and if I work hard enough you come to my homestead and do the same. Not required by very cool karma would be satisfied. Anywhere in Canada!


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peppercorn
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Re: Our families progress! (Pictures)

Post by peppercorn »

Protector wrote:Gardens going well in zone 2. Still looking for hard working folks to share my land with. Near Cochrane, Ontario. PM for info.36522091_2131148340443328_4190135768598970368_o.jpg
That is impressive. What might be missed with just a quick look at that picture is the work beyond building those boxes. You cant get a front end loader in there. I suspect it took a lot of work with a spade a wheel barrel to fill those boxes!
Give a man a gun, and he can rob a bank. Give a man a bank, and he can rob the world.
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farmgal
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Re: Our families progress! (Pictures)

Post by farmgal »

I hope someone takes you up on it, I know how much work goes into my own homestead and gardens. I am lucky enough to get the odd helping hand
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Protector
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Re: Our families progress! (Pictures)

Post by Protector »

Some harvest pictures!
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Protector
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Re: Our families progress! (Pictures)

Post by Protector »

Everyone thinks their prepared for a day without power; What about 3 days on a homestead? We lost power in the mourning that was hot and just after a heat wave. 

  I wake up in the afternoon after getting home from the night shift. The power was out and our preps were being tested. I had bought water that mourning so that saved us from the fact the well wasn't working. The money was in the bank so thank goodness the Internet worked and it wasn't EMP. Wife said we couldn't make dinner. Stove was out and so was the propane and we were on a fire ban to boot. I remembered about the two butane stoves and lots of butane I had put away just in case. So we did have a nice stir fry that night.

  My son left the fridge open a crack so the temperature in the fridge was going down fast. I put 4ltrs of frozen bags of milk to put it back up. We didn't put blankets on the appliances as we thought it was going to last a few mins like all the other outtages. 

 I looked at my 2600 Sq ft garden and dreaded hauling that much water from the creek to water it on top of the greenhouse. We only had one waterer but I would use my food grade buckets so I'd be ok. I went to look to see how the creek was fairing. Bone dry! I'd be ok for one day but I'd be hauling water in my old SUV a km away if it didn't come back by tommorow. It would take hours on end to get the job done

 I was playing chess with my boy when the power came back on. Kids rushed for the Internet without ever knowing how close we were from buying a generator to keep everything cold and hauling water till we were blue in the face.

 My prepper friend talked about getting an inverter for my SUV and I remembered I had one already. Untested; new in the box. I'll have to try it before I get caught again. A trick for someone with a small inverter is to connect a smaller car to a bigger car with booster cables and then connecting the inverter to get larger appliances going. We have all metal roofing but no rain catchment. Another project that got put aside when life took over. No gas, money, propane and very little  reserves. It was now clear we needed an active MAG and pond as well more than ever.

 I was happy for the lesson and realized that a prepper quickly becomes a sheeple without his preps and community! I hope you learn from my mistakes so you don't get stuck in this lucky situation or much much worse.

I tried adding a few pictures but it said error file to large. Just a regular pictures from my passport.

Stay safe by being prepared!

Do you have a situation that tested your preparations? 

Protector

Thrivethrough.com 

Club: Homestead Outpost!
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farmgal
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Re: Our families progress! (Pictures)

Post by farmgal »

Yes, we went though a three day event ourselves, lost power in one of the spring ice storms. So in our case, we had stored water (I always fill any empty spots in the canner with jars of water, so we have a home done supply of water in reserve if needed) plus we have water jugs. so house water was covered, at that time of the year, the rain catchment was back in place and so we had just over 300 gallons of water for the livestock in reserve (that is our basic just in case ) After that, we would have had to hand pump it from the well for restock.

The freezers where covered fast (any power outage has me covering them fast, but I keep frozen two liter pop bottles in them to make them run less when they are not full and so those keep the freezers cold and can have one added at a time to the fridge to keep it cold.. I did my normal fridge trick when the power goes out.. Get your cooler out, add in a frozen water bottle, move everything from the fridge to the cooler that needs to be eaten and then close the fridge up.. if need be.. put a piece of tape across the fridge as a reminder do NOT open! Eat your food out of the cooler as required and needed. Much smaller space to keep cool and that way the fridge door does not get opened.

I have a shuttle chef cooking pot and outstanding rocket stove. The ecozoom. I also have a lot of cast iron to cook with, so the meals where done in three ways, one. The one of the point of canning up food is so that you can eat it cold when needed.. Two, while I do love to cook in the shuttle chef, I have learned that filling it and boiling the water and then holding it is perfect, a wash up, a hot cuppa tea, a hot cuppa coffee. So while I will heat canned goods in the Shuttle Chef, I tend to use it to hold hot water for 8 hours at a time. I do most of my cooking in my cast iron.

Eight sticks of wood in the eco-zoom is enough to boil the water, cook the food etc. that is equal to one small log.. I have a tin roofed over and sheltered pouch, with a cement step, this is where I do my cooking, out of the wind, out of the weather but with open air flow. Its perfect for year round use.


We did have to hook up the inverter to the car battery to run the sump pump and drain out the water in the celler. Having said that we know that the cellar is prone to water issues and so everything in that part of the house is up 12 inches (or one basic turned on its side cement building block in height. To date we have never had water get anywhere near that high.


As for the gardens, well to be honest as much as I admire raised beds, the reason you gave is the reason that very few of my gardens are raised beds in the sense of the norm. I do have a old horse trough "raised" bed gardens, they are manure based hot box's that are filled and covered to extend growing in the spring and fall. I do free form raised beds in most of the gardens in the sense of being 4 to 6 inches pulled from the walk ways over into the loose soiled beds but having said that I plant 90 plus percent of my annual garden's into dry land garden spacing. I also use hugelculture mounds for certain plants that require more steady access to water at the roots level.


And you gave the reason, the perfect reason.. because the simple truth of the matter is we can never haul enough water.. we can haul enough to do a bit of babying of seed starting, we can haul enough to give a little extra now an again to certain fussier plants but overall, if we garden like we have access and ability to move water like we can now.. when push comes to shove.. we are in big trouble.. I love when the weather works and when the plants thrive.. but its more important to me to grow, harvest and save seed from plants that produced in a wet year, a drought year a hot year that pushed them.. Most of the seeds we buy are being babied as seed growers and its up to us to work our own programs and to make them tougher plants!


On the flip side and I am quoting a friend who said it best.. I think my Annuals are my star's of my garden until something goes wrong.. and then its the perennial's that step up and feed my family. This is a simple truth.. its something that I look at hard.. I aim for every five to ten annuals I want at least one perennial food producing plant in my hedge rows, food forest, hugelculture area's.

Yes, I know its more work to do two different systems of gardening, but the good thing about it, is that if the annuals do great, you can put up a extra few months, half year or a whole extra year of food into the pantry (win-win) and the perennial food can go to reduce your critter costs by using it more for fodder or if you don't do critters to really bulk up your compost bins.


What I learned from the event was that having four outdoor working sets of clothing in a ice storm was not enough.. while I heated a small area nicely, the outer wear clothing was not drying out fast enough between uses. I have done some fiddle work on that drying system. It was a strange flaw to find but it was the big one..
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farmgal
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Re: Our families progress! (Pictures)

Post by farmgal »

Here was my little set up in action during the event itself..
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Protector
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Re: Our families progress! (Pictures)

Post by Protector »

Thank you for the very good run down on your event. It gives me hope and makes me feel I'm doing the right thing in pushing perennial systems in my garden. I'm perfecting my shrub layer before moving on to root stock for this harsh climate. Perennials are cheap when bought in bulk from strawberrytyme.ca, Treetime.ca and richters.ca. I'm not getting any more animals until I have ten paddocks/ greenhouses to rotationaly graze them. I like the cooler idea and when try to practice the frozen water trick but refilling after use is key.

This year taught us a major lesson in making sure we add compost in every hole and water catchment system with drip irrigation is a must. Perrenials don't die. They take the heat and keep on fighting year after year without much work after the first few.

Were trying to make landrace seeds too. We got some with radishes and Asian mustard last year. I'm hoping to dig a pond for bulk water catchment. We could fill a cistern and drip irrigate from that too along with the roof catchment. Ideally only when those two sources are empty would I use the well.

If you do a video on your land I'd appreciate seeing it. Canada needs more permaculturalists like you.
Protector
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Re: Our families progress! (Pictures)

Post by Protector »

Bought enough bleach granules for years in one fell swoop. Be careful because the smaller ones are actually 5$ more than the 5gal one at canadian tire.
Protector
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Re: Our families progress! (Pictures)

Post by Protector »

It won't accept my picture file size and I decreased the size twice. Any help on this?
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